International Journal of Medical Sciences

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16 November 2018

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Int J Med Sci 2017; 14(11):1054-1064. doi:10.7150/ijms.20286

Research Paper

Gender-Specific Associations between Low Skeletal Muscle Mass and Albuminuria in the Middle-Aged and Elderly Population

Hye Eun Yoon1, 2, Yunju Nam1, 2, Eunjin Kang1, 2, Hyeon Seok Hwang1, 3, Seok Joon Shin1, 2, Yeon Sik Hong2, 4, Kwi Young Kang 2, 4✉

1. Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea;
2. Department of Internal Medicine, Incheon St. Mary's Hospital;
3. Department of Internal Medicine, Daejeon St. Mary's Hospital;
4. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea.

Abstract

Objective This study assessed gender-specific associations between low muscle mass (LMM) and albuminuria.

Methods Data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011 were employed. The study consisted of 1,087 subjects (≥50 years old). Skeletal muscle index (SMI) was defined as the weight-adjusted appendicular skeletal muscle mass. Mild LMM and severe LMM were defined as SMI that were 1-2 and >2 standard deviations below the sex-specific mean appendicular skeletal muscle mass of young adults, respectively. Increased albuminuria was defined as albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥30mg/g

Results Men with mild and severe LMM were significantly more likely to have increased albuminuria (15.2% and 45.45%, respectively) than men with normal SMI (9.86%, P<0.0001), but not women. Severe LMM associated independently with increased albuminuria in men (OR=7.661, 95% CI=2.72-21.579) but not women. Severe LMM was an independent predictor of increased albuminuria in hypertensive males (OR=11.449, 95% CI=3.037-43.156), non-diabetic males (OR=8.782, 95% CI=3.046-25.322), and males without metabolic syndrome (MetS) (OR=8.183, 95% CI=1.539-43.156). This was not observed in males without hypertension, males with diabetes or MetS, and all female subgroups.

Conclusion Severe LMM associated with increased albuminuria in men, especially those with hypertension and without diabetes or MetS.

Keywords: Low skeletal muscle mass, Albuminuria, Hypertension, Male.

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How to cite this article:
Yoon HE, Nam Y, Kang E, Hwang HS, Shin SJ, Hong YS, Kang KY. Gender-Specific Associations between Low Skeletal Muscle Mass and Albuminuria in the Middle-Aged and Elderly Population. Int J Med Sci 2017; 14(11):1054-1064. doi:10.7150/ijms.20286. Available from http://www.medsci.org/v14p1054.htm