Int J Med Sci 2021; 18(12):2615-2623. doi:10.7150/ijms.59757 This issue

Research Paper

The feasibility of emergency medical technicians performing intermittent high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Chun-Hao Chang1, Yi-Ju Hsu1, Fang Li1, Yuan-Shuo Chan2, Ching-Ping Lo3,4, Guan-Jian Peng3,5, Chin-Shan Ho1✉, Chi-Chang Huang1✉

1. Graduate Institute of Sports Science, National Taiwan Sport University, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
2. Department of Special Education, National Taipei University of Education, Taipei, Taiwan.
3. College of Exercise and Health Science, National Taiwan Sport University, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
4. Ching Shuei Emergency Medical Service Team Of 5th Corps, Fire Department, New Taipei City Government, New Taipei City, Taiwan.
5. Second Special Search and Rescue Branch, Special Search and Rescue Corps, Fire Department, Taoyuan City Government, Taoyuan City, Taiwan.

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). See http://ivyspring.com/terms for full terms and conditions.
Citation:
Chang CH, Hsu YJ, Li F, Chan YS, Lo CP, Peng GJ, Ho CS, Huang CC. The feasibility of emergency medical technicians performing intermittent high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Int J Med Sci 2021; 18(12):2615-2623. doi:10.7150/ijms.59757. Available from https://www.medsci.org/v18p2615.htm

File import instruction

Abstract

Graphic abstract

Background: Whether intermittent chest compressions have an effect on the quality of CPR is worthy of discussion. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in the chest compression quality of emergency medical technicians (EMTs) performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with different rest intervals.

Methods: Seventy male firefighters with EMT licenses participated in this study. Participants completed body composition measurements and three CPR quality tests, as follows: (1) CPR-uninterrupted for 10 minutes; (2) after 2 days of rest, CPR 10s-intermittent (CPR-10s), for 2 minutes each time and 5 cycles; (3) after another 2 days of rest, CPR 20s-intermittent (CPR-20s), for 2 minutes each time and 5 cycles.

Results: Body composition results showed that body mass (BM), body mass index (BMI), upper limb muscle mass (ULMM), core muscle mass (CMM), and upper limb-core muscle mass (UL+CMM) were positively correlated with chest compression depth (CCD) (p < 0.05). Analysis of the three different modes of CPR quality analysis indicated significant differences in the chest compression fraction (CCF, F = 6.801, p = 0.001), chest compression rebound rate (CCRR, F = 3.919, p = 0.021), and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE, F = 23.815, p < 0.001). Among the different performance cycles of CPR-10s, significant differences were found in CCF, CCD, CCR (chest compression rate), and RPE (p < 0.05). On the other hand, among the different performance cycles of CPR-20s, significant differences were found in CCD, CCR, and RPE (p < 0.05). Moreover, the CCF, CCD, and RPE scores of the two tests reached significant differences in specific phases (p < 0.05).

Conclusions: This study confirmed that the upper limb muscle mass or the weight of the upper body of EMTs is positively correlated with the quality of CPR. In addition, intermittent chest compressions with safe interruption intervals can reduce fatigue caused by long-term chest compressions and maintain better chest compression quality.

Keywords: CPR, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, chest compression fraction, fatigue, emergency medical technician