Int J Med Sci 2020; 17(14):2225-2231. doi:10.7150/ijms.47604

Research Paper

Prognostic value of lactate dehydrogenase for in-hospital mortality in severe and critically ill patients with COVID-19

Xingtong Dong1, Lu Sun2, Yan Li3✉

1. Department of Nephrology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Changchun Street #45, Xicheng District 100053, Beijing, China.
2. Department of General Disease, West Campus, Union Hospital Tongji Medical College Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China.
3. Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Changchun Street #45, Xicheng District 100053, Beijing, China.

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Citation:
Dong X, Sun L, Li Y. Prognostic value of lactate dehydrogenase for in-hospital mortality in severe and critically ill patients with COVID-19. Int J Med Sci 2020; 17(14):2225-2231. doi:10.7150/ijms.47604. Available from https://www.medsci.org/v17p2225.htm

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Abstract

Background: Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) has been proved to be a prognostic factor for the severity and poor outcomes of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In most studies, patients with various levels of COVID-19 severity were pooled and analyzed which may prevent accurate evaluation of the relationship between LDH and disease progression and in-hospital death. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the association of LDH with in-hospital mortality in severe and critically ill patients with COVID-19.

Methods: This single-center retrospective study enrolled 119 patients. Survival curves were plotted using Kaplan-Meier method and compared by log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression models were used to determine the independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality. Receiver-operator curves (ROCs) were constructed to evaluate the predictive accuracy of LDH and other prognostic biomarkers.

Results: Compared to the survival group, LDH levels in the dead group were significantly higher [559.5 (172, 7575) U/L vs 228 (117, 490) U/L, (P < 0.001)]. In Multivariate Cox regression, it remained an independent risk factor for in-hospital mortality (Hazard ratio 5.985, 95.0%CI: 1.498-23.905; P=0.011). A cutoff value of 353.5 U/L predicted the in-hospital mortality with a sensitivity of 94.4% and a specificity of 89.2% respectively.

Conclusion: LDH is a favorable prognostic biomarker with high accuracy for predicting in-hospital mortality in severe and critically ill patients with COVID-19. This may direct physicians worldwide to effectively prioritize resources for patients at high risk of death and to implement more aggressive treatments at an earlier phase to save patients' lives.

Keywords: COVID-19, lactate dehydrogenase, prognostic value, multiple organ dysfunction