Int J Med Sci 2010; 7(6):378-384. doi:10.7150/ijms.7.378

Case Report

Non-syndromic multiple supernumerary teeth in a family unit with a normal karyotype: case report

Francesco Inchingolo1, Marco Tatullo2, Fabio M. Abenavoli3, Massimo Marrelli4, Alessio D. Inchingolo5, Mattia Gentile6, Angelo M. Inchingolo5, Gianna Dipalma7

1. Department of Dental Sciences and Surgery, University of Bari, Bari, Italy
2. Department of Medical Biochemistry, Medical Biology and Physics, University of Bari, Bari, Italy
3. Department of “Head and Neck Surgery”, Hospital “Fatebenefratelli”, Rome, Italy
4. Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Calabrodental, Crotone, Italy
5. Department of Dental Sciences and Surgery, University of Milano, Milano, Italy
6. Department of Medical Genetic, Hospital “Di Venere”, Bari, Italy
7. Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Calabrodental, Crotone, Italy

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Citation:
Inchingolo F, Tatullo M, Abenavoli FM, Marrelli M, Inchingolo AD, Gentile M, Inchingolo AM, Dipalma G. Non-syndromic multiple supernumerary teeth in a family unit with a normal karyotype: case report. Int J Med Sci 2010; 7(6):378-384. doi:10.7150/ijms.7.378. Available from http://www.medsci.org/v07p0378.htm

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Abstract

Introduction. Hyperdontia is an odontostomatologic anomaly characterized by an excess in tooth number. It seems to occur more often in patients with hereditary factors concerning this anomaly: this case represents a rare form of hyperdontia, with bilateral multiple supernumerary teeth, with evident penetrance of the phenotype in the family unit engaged in the present study. The karyotype determination excludes a pathogenesis on chromosomal basis.

Case report. A 30 years old patient came to our observation with five impacted teeth (1.8, 2.8, 3.8, 4.7 and 4.8), as well as with the presence of an impacted supernumerary tooth (distomolar 4.9). The patient was suggested to allow us to perform a radiologic screening to his two sisters aged 17 and 13 years.

The X-ray photography showed that the elder sister had nine impacted teeth; these were 1.8 - 1.9 - 2.8 - 2.9 - 2.10 - 3.8 - 3.9 - 4.8 - 4.9; while the youngest sister had four impacted teeth, that is 1.8 - 1.9 - 2.8 - 2.9.

Conclusions. The value of the present case report can be used as a paradigm for the assessment of the hereditary factors predisposing the onset of hyperdontia, and for the consequent management by oral surgeon of family units in which the odontostomatologic anomaly was detected without any syndromic forms.

Keywords: Hyperdontia, supernumerary teeth, impacted teeth.