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Int J Med Sci 2012; 9(1):27-32. doi:10.7150/ijms.9.27

Research Paper

Efficacy of Lamivudine or Entecavir on Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Hepatitis B

Tatsuo Kanda1* Corresponding address, Masami Shinozaki2*, Hidehiro Kamezaki1, Shuang Wu1, Shingo Nakamoto1, Makoto Arai1, Keiichi Fujiwara1, Nobuaki Goto2, Fumio Imazeki1, Osamu Yokosuka1

1. Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Chiba University, Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670, Japan.
2. Department of Medicine, Numazu City Hospital, Numazu, Shizuoka 410-0302, Japan.
* These authors contributed equally to this article.

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY-NC) License. See http://ivyspring.com/terms for full terms and conditions.
How to cite this article:
Kanda T, Shinozaki M, Kamezaki H, Wu S, Nakamoto S, Arai M, Fujiwara K, Goto N, Imazeki F, Yokosuka O. Efficacy of Lamivudine or Entecavir on Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Hepatitis B. Int J Med Sci 2012; 9(1):27-32. doi:10.7150/ijms.9.27. Available from http://www.medsci.org/v09p0027.htm

Abstract

Background/Aims: Spontaneous acute exacerbation of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection occasionally occurs in its natural history, sometimes leading rapidly to fatal hepatic failure. We compared the effects of lamivudine (LAM) with those of entecavir (ETV) treatments in acute exacerbation of chronic hepatitis B with 500 IU/L or higher alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels.

Methods: Thirty-four patients with acute exacerbation were consecutively treated with LAM /ETV. Their clinical improvements were compared.

Results: Among LAM-treated and ETV-treated patients, none showed a reduction of <1 log IU/mL in HBV DNA after 1 or 3 months of treatment. Initial virological response, defined as a reduction of 4 log IU/mL in HBV DNA at 6 months, with LAM and ETV, respectively, was 83.3% and 100%. One LAM patient developed hepatic encephalopathy, but all patients in both groups survived. Twelve months after treatment, 41.6% of 24 LAM group patients switched to another drug or added adefovir to their treatment due to the emergence of LAM-resistant mutants. On the other hand, patients receiving ETV did not need to change drugs.

Conclusions: ETV appears to be as effective as LAM in the treatment of patients with acute exacerbation of chronic hepatitis B. Clinicians should carefully start to treat these patients as soon as possible.

Keywords: acute exacerbation, ALT, entecavir, HBV, lamivudine

INTRODUCTION

Chronic hepatitis B infection is associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma [1]. Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) also leads to wide a spectrum of liver injury, including acute, self-limited infection, fulminant hepatitis, and chronic hepatitis with progression to cirrhosis and liver failure, as well as to an asymptomatic chronic carrier state [2, 3].

Reactivation of hepatitis B is a well-characterized syndrome marked by the abrupt reappearance or rise of HBV DNA in the serum of a patient with previously inactivated or resolved HBV infection [4]. Reactivation is often spontaneous, but can also be triggered by cancer chemotherapy and immune suppression. Spontaneous acute exacerbation of chronic hepatitis B infection is seen with a cumulative probability of 15-37% after 4 years of follow-up [5]. Prognosis is generally poor in HBV carriers with spontaneous acute exacerbation together with high alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, jaundice, and liver failure [4, 6, 7]. This condition has been defined as acute-on-chronic liver failure according to a recent Asia-Pacific consensus recommendation [8]. Acute exacerbation occasionally leads to a critical scenario, meaning that clinicians need to treat this condition immediately.

Lamivudine (LAM) is a reverse-transcriptase inhibitor of viral DNA polymerase with an excellent profile of safety and tolerability, causing inhibition of viral replication, and it is approved for antiviral treatment of hepatitis B patients [9, 10]. LAM suppresses serum HBV DNA values in up to 98% of patients within a median period of 4 weeks, leading to aminotransferase normalization, increased hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion rate, and improvement of histological parameters [11, 12]. A study from Taiwan showed that LAM had a survival benefit and was effective for patients with baseline bilirubin levels below 20 mg/dL [7].

Entecavir (ETV), a deoxyguanosine analogue, is a potent and selective inhibitor of HBV replication; its in vitro potency is 100- to 1,000-fold greater than that of LAM, and it has a selectivity index (concentration of drug reducing the viable cell number by 50% [CC50]/concentration of drug reducing viral replication by 50% [EC50]) of ~8,000 [13, 14]. At present, the Japanese national health insurance system approves ETV as the first-line therapy for chronic hepatitis B, although some patients are treated with standard interferon-alfa. ETV is a nucleoside analogue (NUC) belonging to a new subgroup, cyclopentane [15], and it has been shown to be highly effective in suppressing HBV replication to an undetectable level and normalizing ALT, although NUCs do not eradicate the virus. ETV develops less resistance than LAM.

We undertook a retrospective study to compare the efficacy of LAM with that of ETV in the reduction of HBV DNA levels and associated improvement in disease severity and biochemical recovery in patients with acute exacerbation together with higher ALT levels due to HBV reactivation.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Patients

A retrospective analysis of LAM/ETV-treated chronic hepatitis B patients at Chiba University Hospital and Numazu City Hospital, Japan, between May 2003 and December 2009 was performed. The inclusion criteria were: acute exacerbation of chronic hepatitis B characterized by an elevation of ALT level ≥ 500 IU/L along with HBV DNA ≥ 4.5 log IU/mL presenting in a patient with diagnosed chronic liver disease. The exclusion criteria were: acute hepatitis B, superinfection with other viruses (hepatitis E, A, D, or C), other causes of chronic liver failure [16, 17], coexistent hepatocellular carcinoma, portal thrombosis, coexistent renal impairment, pregnancy, coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), or patients who had received a previous course of NUC treatment. This retrospective study protocol conforms to the ethical guidelines of the 1975 Declaration of Helsinki as reflected in a priori approval by the Ethics Committee of Chiba University, Graduate School of Medicine [18].

Baseline assessment of patients

Retrospectively collected data included patient demographics, clinical findings, all laboratory variables including virological tests and abdominal ultrasound. HBsAg, HBeAg, anti-HBe antibody and immunoglobulin M (IgM) anti-HBc antibody were determined by ELISA (Abbott, Chicago, IL, USA) or CLEIA (Fujirebio, Tokyo, Japan) [19]. HBV genotype was determined from patients' sera by ELISA (Institute of Immunology, Tokyo, Japan) as reported by Usuda et al [20]. HBV DNA was measured by Roche AmplicorTM PCR assay (detection limits: 2.6 log IU/mL; Roche Diagnostics, Tokyo, Japan).

Definitions

Primary antiviral treatment failure was defined as a reduction of < 1 log IU/mL in HBV DNA after 3 months of therapy. Initial virological response (IVR) was defined as a reduction of ≥ 4 log IU/mL in HBV DNA after 6 months of therapy [21].

Follow-up

Clinical assessment and routine investigations were done every 15 days or every month for at least 6 months. HBV DNA measurements were repeated monthly.

Statistical analysis

Statistical analyses were performed using Microsoft Excel 2010 for WindowsTM 7 and StatView 5 (SAS Institute Inc, Cary, NC). Continuous variables were expressed as mean ± standard deviation and were compared by two-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) and two-way repeated measures ANOVA. Categorical variables were compared by Chi-square test. Baseline was taken as the date when the first dose of LAM/ETV was administered. Statistical significance was considered at a P-value < 0.05.

RESULTS

Patients

Between May 2003 and December 2009, 34 patients with spontaneous acute exacerbation of chronic hepatitis B, with ALT levels ≥ 500 IU/mL and treated with LAM or ETV, were consecutively enrolled and retrospectively analyzed. 24 (70.5%) were treated with LAM at 100 mg daily and 10 (29.4%) were treated with ETV at 0.5 mg daily. All patients were followed for at least 6 months. Mean follow-up in the LAM and ETV groups was 55.5 ± 25.4 and 16.5 ± 9.9 months, respectively.

Baseline characteristics

Baseline characteristics in the two patient groups were similar (Table 1). Median age was 37 (21-73) years and 79.4% were men. One patient of the LAM group developed hepatic encephalopathy, but recovered. All patients in both groups survived. At admission, the serological profile showed HBsAg positivity in all 34 (100%); 22 (64.7%) were HBeAg positive. The median HBV DNA level was 7.4 log IU/mL in the LAM group and 7.9 log IU/mL in the ETV group (Table 1).

 Table 1 

Demographic, Clinical, and Laboratory Variables of Patients at Entry.

ParametersTotal Patients (N=34)LAM (N=24)ETV (N=10)P-value
Age (years)37 (21-73)37 (21-73)39 (24-67)NS
Male (%)27 (79.4)18 (75)9 (90)NS
Cirrhosis (+/-)2/322/220/10NS
ALT (IU/L)986 (523-2,450)995 (523-2,450)1,046 (523-2,140)NS
T. Bil (mg/dL)2.0 (0.8-22.0)2.4 (0.8-20.6)1.6 (1.9-22.0)NS
PT (%)83 (24-121)81.5 (24-119)83.6 (35-121)NS
HBeAg (+/-)22/1218/64/6NS
HBV DNA (log IU/mL)7.6 (4.8-8.7)7.4 (5.2-8.7)7.9 (4.8-8.7)NS

LAM, lamivudine; ETV, entecavir; ALT, alanine aminotransferase; T. BIL, total bilirubin; PT, prothrombin time; NS, statistically not significant.

Reduction in HBV DNA of total patients

LAM significantly reduced HBV DNA levels from baseline 7.24 log IU/mL to 3.27 log IU/mL at 1 month (P < 0.001), to 2.21 log IU/mL at 3 months (P < 0.001), and to 1.53 log IU/mL at 6 months (P < 0.001). ETV also significantly reduced HBV DNA levels from baseline 7.56 log IU/mL to 3.12 log IU/mL at 1 month (P < 0.001), to 2.14 log IU/mL at 3 months (P < 0.001), and to 1.77 log IU/mL at 6 months (P < 0.001). There were no differences in HBV DNA levels from baseline to 6 months between the two groups. None with primary antiviral treatment failure was identified in either group. There were no significant differences in IVR between the two groups (Figure 1).

Reduction in ALT levels of total patients

LAM significantly reduced ALT levels from baseline 1,130 IU/mL to 102 (P < 0.001) at 1 month, to 28.6 (P < 0.001) at 3 months, and to 23.1 (P < 0.001) at 6 months. ETV also significantly reduced ALT levels from baseline 1,210 IU/mL to 117 (P < 0.001) at 1 month, to 25 (P < 0.001) at 3 months, and to 24.4 (P < 0.001) at 6 months. There were no differences in ALT levels from baseline to 6 months between the two groups (Figure 2).

 Figure 1 

Initial virological response (IVR). IVR was defined as a reduction of ≥ 4 log IU/mL in HBV DNA after 6 months of therapy [21].

Int J Med Sci Image (Click on the image to enlarge.)
 Figure 2 

Efficacy of lamivudine and entecavir for ALT levels. Lamivudine (N=24) vs. entecavir (N=10); data are shown as mean ± SD.

Int J Med Sci Image (Click on the image to enlarge.)

Reduction in HBV DNA of HBeAg-positive patients

It has been demonstrated that the levels of HBV DNA in the HBeAg-positive phase were generally higher than those in the ant-HBe-positive phase [19, 22]. HBeAg positivity is also associated with HBV viremia and increased ALT levels in HIV/HBV co-infected patients [23]. Next, we compared the response to LAM or ETV in 18 or 4 HBeAg-positive patients, respectively (Table 2). LAM significantly reduced HBV DNA levels from baseline 7.52 log IU/mL to 3.35 log IU/mL (P < 0.001) at 1 month, to 2.38 log IU/mL (P < 0.001) at 3 months, and to 1.55 log IU/mL (P < 0.001) at 6 months. ETV also significantly reduced HBV DNA levels from baseline 8.42 log IU/mL to 3.87 log IU/mL (P < 0.001) at 1 month, to 2.90 log IU/mL (P < 0.001) at 3 months, and to 2.22 log IU/mL (P < 0.001) at 6 months. There were no differences in HBV DNA levels from baseline to 6 months between the two groups. Primary antiviral treatment failure was not observed in either group. Four patients in the LAM group did not achieve IVR.

 Table 2 

Demographic, Clinical, and Laboratory Variables of HBeAg-positive Patients at Entry.

ParametersTotal Patients (N=22)LAM (N=18)ETV (N=4)P-value
Age (years)34.5 (21-51)36.5 (21-51)30 (24-33)NS
Male (%)18 (81.8)14 (77.7)4 (100)NS
Cirrhosis (+/-)1/211/170/4NS
ALT (IU/L)1,030 (523-2,450)1,990 (523-2,450)1,363 (980-1,620)NS
T. Bil (mg/dL)1.75 (0.8-20.6)2.0 (0.8-20.6)1.5 (1.0-18.7)NS
PT (%)77 (24-119)73.6 (24-119)95.0 (44.1-113)NS
HBeAg (+)22184
HBV DNA (log IU/mL)7.6 (5.5- 8.8)7.6 (5.5- 8.7)8.6 (7.6- 8.7)NS

LAM, lamivudine; ETV, entecavir; ALT, alanine aminotransferase; T. BIL, total bilirubin; PT, prothrombin time; NS, statistically not significant.

Reduction in ALT levels of HBeAg-positive patients

LAM significantly reduced ALT levels from baseline 1,150 IU/mL to 84 (P < 0.001) at 1 month, to 27.5 (P < 0.001) at 3 months, and to 22.0 (P < 0.001) at 6 months. ETV also significantly reduced ALT levels from baseline 1,460 IU/mL to 230 (P = 0.0038) at 1 month, to 22.2 (P = 0.0016) at 3 months, and to 24.0 (P = 0.0016) at 6 months. At 1 month after treatment, the ALT levels of the LAM groups were lower than those of the ETV group (P < 0.0001) (Figure 3). During follow-up periods, 10 and 1 sero-converters of HBeAg to anti-HBe antibody phase were seen in 18 LAM-treated and in 4 ETV-treated patients, respectively.

 Figure 3 

Efficacy of lamivudine and entecavir for ALT levels in HBeAg-positive patients. Lamivudine (N=18) vs. entecavir (N=4); data are shown as mean ± SD.

Int J Med Sci Image (Click on the image to enlarge.)

Safety

No patient stopped taking medications. Twelve months after treatment, 10 of 24 patients (41.6%) in the LAM group switched from LAM to ETV (n=4) or added adefovir (n=6) due to the emergence of LAM-resistant mutants. On the other hand, patients receiving ETV did not need to change their medication.

DISCUSSION

The present study compared the use of NUCs, LAM and ETV, for the treatment of acute exacerbation of chronic hepatitis B. The results clearly showed significant benefits of a rapid reduction of HBV DNA levels, compared with untreated patients in a previous report [4].

It was reported that ETV treatment is associated with increased short-term mortality in patients with severe acute exacerbation of chronic hepatitis B, but that it achieves better virological response in the long run [24]. We used LAM or ETV for patients with acute exacerbation of chronic hepatitis B presenting with ALT ≥ 500 IU/L in the present study. The effects of LAM on HBV DNA levels were the same as those of ETV (Figure 1). But the effects of LAM on ALT levels after 1 month were stronger than those of ETV in HBeAg-positive patients (Figure 3). In spite of the limited number of these patients, the effects were possibly related to immunomodulating activities of LAM [25]. The patients' prognoses were more favorable than in the previous report [4]. This might have depended on the fact that, in the present study, treatment was begun as soon as possible, and some patients may have had a milder grade of acute exacerbation of chronic hepatitis B than those in the previous report [4]. We believe that patients with acute exacerbation of chronic hepatitis B need to be subjected to treatment as promptly as possible.

The major routes of HBV infection in our country have been mother-to-child transmission and blood transfusion. However, cases with HBV transmitted through sexual contact are increasing, especially among HIV-1-seropositive patients [26]. One should bear in mind that knowledge about interactions between ETV and anti-HIV nucleoside analogues is limited [27]. Because long-term use of LAM induces LAM-resistant mutants [28], we can only use LAM for short-term treatment of patients with acute exacerbation of chronic hepatitis B. On the other hand, the present study also revealed that patients receiving ETV did not need to change drugs.

Recently, there have been several reports that reactivation of HBV is a fatal complication following systemic chemotherapy or other immunosuppressive therapy including rituximab and steroid therapies mainly in HBsAg-positive and -negative lymphoma patients. It is important to enable early diagnosis of HBV reactivation as well as initiation of antiviral therapy [29, 30].

In conclusion, ETV appears to be as effective as LAM in the treatment of patients with acute exacerbation of chronic hepatitis B. Clinicians should start to treat these patients with NUCs as soon as possible.

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Japan Science and Technology Agency, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan [21590829 (TK), 21590828 (FI), and 21390225 (OY)], a grant from the Japan Society of Hepatology (TK), and a grant from Chiba University Young Research-Oriented Faculty Member Development Program in Bioscience Areas (TK).

This work was partly presented at 21st Conference of the Asian Pacific Association for the Study of the Liver on 17 February 2011, Queen Sirkit National Convention Center, Bangkok, Thailand.

ABBREVIATIONS

ETV: Entecavir; HIV: Human immunodeficiency virus; IVR: Initial virological response; LAM: Lamivudine; NUC: Nucleoside analogue.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST

The authors have declared that no conflict of interest exists.

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Author contact

Corresponding address Corresponding author: Tatsuo Kanda, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8677, Japan. Tel.: +81-43-226-2086; Fax: +81-43-226-2088; E-mail: kandat-cibac.jp


Received 2011-9-21
Accepted 2011-10-31
Published 2011-11-10