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Int J Med Sci 2009; 6(3):116-117. doi:10.7150/ijms.6.116

Editorial

Introduction to special issue on Eye and Zoonosis - from the guest editors

Jelka G. ORSONI, Paolo MORA Corresponding address

Inflammatory and Autoimmune Ocular Diseases Service - Institute of Ophthalmology - University of Parma - Italy

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY-NC) License. See http://ivyspring.com/terms for full terms and conditions.
How to cite this article:
ORSONI JG, MORA P. Introduction to special issue on Eye and Zoonosis - from the guest editors. Int J Med Sci 2009; 6(3):116-117. doi:10.7150/ijms.6.116. Available from http://www.medsci.org/v06p0116.htm

Abstract

Papers of this special issue are based on the presentations given in the Congress “Eye and Zoonosis” - October 10-11th 2008, Parma (Italy). This issue aims to provide researchers with timely update on a number of important topics on Zoonosis in Ophthalmology.

 

On the occasion of the first International Congress on Ocular Zoonoses held in Lausanne, Switzerland in 2006, we were asked by the promoter, Dr. Yan Guex-Crosier, to organize the second Congress in Parma, Italy. It was a great pleasure for us to accept this invitation.

We do believe that every ophthalmologist coping with inflammatory eye diseases, either because specifically working on inflammation or because inflammation has been observed by chance during an ocular examination performed for other purposes, must be aware of zoonotic diseases that affect the eye.

This Congress held in Parma during two half-day sessions could not cover all zoonoses; consequently, only those most frequently observed in the European/Mediterranean area were dealt with.

Zoonoses may be imported by immigrants, who represent a relatively recent phenomenon in Italy; but also travellers coming back from endemic areas are transmitting diseases hitherto unknown or forgotten in our own countries. Moreover, it must be remembered that our domestic animals can also be transmitters of zoonoses. If our pets, such as dogs and cats, are correctly cared for, they will not represent a reservoir for ticks, fleas and other potential vectors.

Ocular zoonoses can no longer be ignored; every ophthalmologist, working on his own or in a public institution must remember that a red eye or a vitriitis or retinitis without any current explanation might be due to a disease transmitted by arthropod vectors from foreign countries or by animals.

Correct information on this subject will prove extremely useful to our patients, avoiding severe consequences of ocular function.

Contents of this special issue are based on the presentations given in the Congress “Eye and Zoonosis” - October 10-11th 2008, Parma (Italy). They include:

  • Incidence of ocular Zoonoses referred to the Inflammatory and Autoimmune Ocular Diseases Service of the University of Parma (Italy)
  • Introduction into Pathology of Ocular Zoonoses
  • Local epidemiology and clinical manifestations of Lyme disease
  • Ocular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis in Europe
  • Ocular manifestations of Rickttesiosis: 1. Mediterranean Spotted Fever: laboratory analysis and case reports
  • Ocular manifestations of Rickttesiosis: 2. Retinal involvement and treatment
  • Ocular Toxocariasis
  • Ocular Bartonellosis
  • Human toxoplasmosis and the role of veterinary clinicians
  • Laboratory diagnosis of Toxoplasma gondii infection
  • Congenital and acquired Toxoplasmosis (The content of Dr Brezin's presentation has been published in the December 2008 issue of the American Journal of Ophthalmology: Delair E, Monnet D, Grabar S, Dupouy-Camet J, Yera H, Brézin AP. Respective roles of acquired and congenital infections in presumed ocular toxoplasmosis. Am J Ophthalmol 2008;146:851-5).
  • Optical Coherence Tomography in ocular toxoplasmosis
  • Usefulness of vitrectomy in the treatment of ocular toxoplasmosis
  • Update on the treatment of ocular toxoplasmosis.

We hope that this special issue will be interesting to readers and provides researchers with timely update on various topics in this important field.

Conflict of Interest

The authors have declared that no conflict of interest exists.

Author contact

Corresponding address Correspondence to: Dr. Paolo MORA, Inflammatory and Autoimmune Ocular Diseases Service - Institute of Ophthalmology - University of Parma - Italy. E-mail: paolo.morait


Published 2009-3-19