Int J Med Sci 2021; 18(7):1566-1569. doi:10.7150/ijms.53907

Research Paper

The relationship between premorbid intelligence and symptoms of severe anorexia nervosa restricting type

Keizaburo Ogata1,2, Ken Ichiro Koyama3, Takamasa Fukumoto2, Suguru Kawazu2, Mihoko Kawamoto2, Eriko Yamaguchi2, Yuuki Fuku2, Marie Amitani2,4, Haruka Amitani2, Ken Ichiro Sagiyama2, Akio Inui5, Akihiro Asakawa2✉

1. Division of Clinical Psychology, Kitasato University Hospital, Kanagawa, Japan.
2. Department of Psychosomatic Internal Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima, Japan.
3. Faculty of Integrated Human Studies and Social Sciences, Fukuoka Prefectural University Graduate School of Human and Social Sciences, Fukuoka, Japan.
4. Education Center for Doctors in Remote Islands and Rural Areas, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima, Japan.
5. Pharmacological Department of Herbal Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima, Japan.

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Citation:
Ogata K, Koyama KI, Fukumoto T, Kawazu S, Kawamoto M, Yamaguchi E, Fuku Y, Amitani M, Amitani H, Sagiyama KI, Inui A, Asakawa A. The relationship between premorbid intelligence and symptoms of severe anorexia nervosa restricting type. Int J Med Sci 2021; 18(7):1566-1569. doi:10.7150/ijms.53907. Available from https://www.medsci.org/v18p1566.htm

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Abstract

The purposes of this study were as follows: to compare premorbid IQ with present IQ in patients with more severe anorexia nervosa restricting type (AN-R) and to investigate the relationship between decreasing IQ and symptoms in patients with severe AN-R. Twenty-two participants were recruited (12 were AN-R patients; 10 were healthy controls). The average BMI in AN-R patients and healthy controls was 12.65 and 19.82, respectively. We assessed the outcomes using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III), the Japanese Adult Reading Test, The Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2), Beck Depression Scale-2 (BDI-2) and State-Trait Anxiety Index. In two-way ANOVA, there were significant interactions for the FIQ and PIQ. Only in the AN-R group, a significant single main effect of time was evidenced for the FIQ and PIQ. In the AN-R group, a significantly high positive correlation was found between changes in the PIQ and the body dissatisfaction subscale of the EDI-2. These findings raise the possibility that in patients with severe AN-R, an excessive decrease in body weight induces decreased PIQ; as a result, they have worse dissatisfaction with their body shape.

Keywords: premorbid intelligence, anorexia nervosa