Int J Med Sci 2020; 17(4):517-524. doi:10.7150/ijms.40241

Research Paper

Tooth loss early in life induces hippocampal morphology remodeling in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice

Masahisa Katano1, Kyoko Kajimoto1, Mitsuo Iinuma1, Kagaku Azuma2✉, Kin-ya Kubo3

1. Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Asahi University School of Dentistry, 1851 Hozumi, Mizuho, Gifu, 501-0296, Japan
2. Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka, 807-8555, Japan
3. Graduate School of Human Life Science, Nagoya Women's University, 3-40 Shioji-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi, 467-8610, Japan

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Citation:
Katano M, Kajimoto K, Iinuma M, Azuma K, Kubo Ky. Tooth loss early in life induces hippocampal morphology remodeling in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice. Int J Med Sci 2020; 17(4):517-524. doi:10.7150/ijms.40241. Available from http://www.medsci.org/v17p0517.htm

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Abstract

Long-term tooth loss is associated with the suppression of hippocampal neurogenesis and impairment of hippocampus-dependent cognition with aging. The morphologic basis of the hippocampal alterations, however, remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether tooth loss early in life affects the hippocampal ultrastructure in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice, using transmission electron microscopy. Male SAMP8 mice were randomized into control or tooth-loss groups. All maxillary molar teeth were removed at 1 month of age. Hippocampal morphologic alterations were evaluated at 9 months of age. Tooth loss early in life induced mitochondrial damage and lipofuscin accumulation in the hippocampal neurons. A thinner myelin sheath and decreased postsynaptic density length were also observed. Our results revealed that tooth loss early in life may lead to hippocampal ultrastructure remodeling and subsequent hippocampus-dependent cognitive impairment in SAMP8 mice with aging.

Keywords: tooth loss, hippocampus, transmission electron microscopy, mitochondria, myelin sheath, synapse