International Journal of Medical Sciences

Impact factor
2.399

24 June 2018

ISSN 1449-1907 News feeds of published articles

Manuscript login | Account

Theranostics

Journal of Cancer

International Journal of Biological Sciences

Journal of Genomics

Journal of Bone and Joint Infection (JBJI)

Oncomedicine

Journal of Biomedicine

Nanotheranostics

PubMed Central Indexed in Journal Impact Factor

Int J Med Sci 2018; 15(5):425-429. doi:10.7150/ijms.23480

Research Paper

Vascular Hyperpermeability Response in Animals Systemically Exposed to Arsenic

Shih-Chieh Chen1,2,3✉, Chao-Yuah Chang3, Ming-Lu Lin4

1. Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Kaohsiung, Taiwan
2. Department of Medical Research, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
3. Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
4. Department of Sports Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan

Abstract

The mechanisms underlying cardiovascular diseases induced by chronic exposure to arsenic remain unclarified. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether increased vascular leakage is induced by inflammatory mustard oil in mice systemically exposed to various doses of arsenic and whether an increased vascular leakage response is still present in arsenic-fed mice after arsenic discontinuation for 2 or 6 months. ICR mice were fed water or various doses of sodium arsenite (10, 15, or 20 mg/kg/day; 5 days/week) for 8 weeks. In separate experiments, the mice were treated with sodium arsenite (20 mg/kg) for 2 or 8 weeks, followed by arsenic discontinuation for 2 or 6 months. Vascular permeability to inflammatory mustard oil was quantified using Evans blue (EB) techniques. Both arsenic-exposed and water-fed (control) mice displayed similar basal levels of EB leakage in the ears brushed with mineral oil, a vehicle of mustard oil. The levels of EB leakage induced by mustard oil in the arsenic groups fed with sodium arsenite (10 or 15 mg/kg) were similar to those of water-fed mice. However, increased levels of EB leakage in response to mustard oil stimulation were significantly higher in mice treated with sodium arsenite (20 mg/kg; high dose) than in arsenic-fed (10 or 15 mg/kg; low and middle doses) or control mice. After arsenic discontinuation for 2 or 6 months, mustard oil-induced vascular EB leakage in arsenic-fed (20 mg/kg) mice was similar to that in control mice. Dramatic increases in mustard oil-induced vascular leakage were only present in mice systemically exposed to the high arsenic dose, indicating the synergistic effects of the high arsenic dose and mustard oil.

Keywords: Arsenic, sodium arsenite, vascular leakage, vascular hyperpermeability, mustard oil, vasoactive agents

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY-NC) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/). See http://ivyspring.com/terms for full terms and conditions.
How to cite this article:
Chen SC, Chang CY, Lin ML. Vascular Hyperpermeability Response in Animals Systemically Exposed to Arsenic. Int J Med Sci 2018; 15(5):425-429. doi:10.7150/ijms.23480. Available from http://www.medsci.org/v15p0425.htm