International Journal of Medical Sciences

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17 October 2017

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Int J Med Sci 2017; 14(9):911-919. doi:10.7150/ijms.19998

Research Paper

Gender-dimorphic effects of adipose-derived stromal vascular fractions on HUVECs exposed to oxidative stress

Soyeon Lim1,2,*, Il-Kwon Kim1,3,*, Jung-Won Choi1,2, Hyang-Hee Seo4, Kyu Hee Lim5, Seahyoung Lee1,2, Hoon-Bum Lee1,7, Sang Woo Kim1,2✉, Ki-Chul Hwang1,2✉

1. Catholic Kwandong University, International St. Mary's Hospital, Incheon Metropolitan City, 22711, Republic of Korea
2. Institute for Bio-Medical Convergence, College of Medicine, Catholic Kwandong University, Gangneung-si, Gangwon-do 25601, Republic of Korea
3. Cell Therapy Center, Catholic Kwandong University International St. Mary's Hospital, Incheon Metropolitan City, 22711, Republic of Korea
4. Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 03722, Republic of Korea
5. Department of Veterinary Physiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Biosafety Research Institute, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju City, Jeollabuk-Do, Republic of Korea
6. Department of Integrated Omics for Biomedical Sciences, Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul, 03722, Republic of Korea
7. Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Catholic Kwandong University, International St. Mary's Hospital, Incheon Metropolitan City, 22711, Republic of Korea
* S. Lim and I.-K. Kim contributed equally to this work.

Abstract

Stromal vascular fractions (SVFs) are a heterogeneous collection of cells within adipose tissue that are being studied for various clinical indications. In this study, we aimed to determine whether SVF transplantation into impaired tissues has differential effects on inflammatory and angiogenetic properties with regard to gender. As reactive oxygen species have been implicated in cardiovascular disease development, we investigated differences in gene and protein expression related to inflammation and angiogenesis in HUVECs co-cultured with adipose-derived SVFs from male (M group) and female (F group) individuals under oxidative stress conditions. The expression of several inflammatory (interleukin (IL)-33) and angiogenetic (platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)) factors differed dramatically between male and female donors. Anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenetic responses were observed in HUVECs co-cultured with SVFs under oxidative stress conditions, and these characteristics may exhibit partially differential effects according to gender. Using network analysis, we showed that co-culturing HUVECs with SVFs ameliorated pyroptosis/apoptosis via an increase in oxidative stress. Activation of caspase-1 and IL-1B was significantly altered in HUVECs co-cultured with SVFs from female donors. These findings regarding gender-dimorphic regulation of adipose-derived SVFs provide valuable information that can be used for evidence-based gender-specific clinical treatment of SVF transplantation for understanding of cardiovascular disease, allowing for the development of additional treatment.

Keywords: Human adipose-derived stromal vascular fractions, Gender, HUVECs, Oxidative stress, Inflammation, Angiogenesis

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How to cite this article:
Lim S, Kim IK, Choi JW, Seo HH, Lim KH, Lee S, Lee HB, Kim SW, Hwang KC. Gender-dimorphic effects of adipose-derived stromal vascular fractions on HUVECs exposed to oxidative stress. Int J Med Sci 2017; 14(9):911-919. doi:10.7150/ijms.19998. Available from http://www.medsci.org/v14p0911.htm