Int J Med Sci 2013; 10(9):1092-1098. doi:10.7150/ijms.6251

Research Paper

Citrobacter Peritoneal Dialysis Peritonitis: Rare Occurrence with Poor Outcomes

Chia-Ter Chao1,2, Szu-Ying Lee3, Wei-Shun Yang4, Huei-Wen Chen2, Cheng-Chung Fang2,5, Chung-Jen Yen2,6, Chih-Kang Chiang2,7, Kuan-Yu Hung2, Jenq-Wen Huang2✉

1. Department of Traumatology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan;
2. Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine; National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan;
3. Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital Yun-Lin Branch, Yun-Lin County, Taiwan;
4. Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital Hsin-Chu Branch, Hsin-Chu County, Taiwan;
5. Department of Emergency Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan;
6. Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan;
7. Department of Integrative diagnostics and Therapeutics, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

Abstract

Introduction: Non-Pseudomonas gram-negative bacteria are responsible for an increasing proportion of cases of peritoneal dialysis (PD)-related peritonitis. The role of Citrobacter species in the etiology of PD-related peritonitis is often underestimated. In the present study, we aimed to describe the clinical features, laboratory findings, and short- and long-term outcomes in PD-related peritonitis caused by Citrobacter.

Methods: A retrospective review of all episodes of PD-related peritonitis caused by Citrobacter from a single center between 1990 and 2010 was performed. Clinical features, microbiological data, and outcomes of these episodes were analyzed.

Results: Citrobacter species was responsible for 11 PD-related episodes (1.8% of all peritonitis episodes) in 8 patients. Citrobacter freundii was the most common etiologic species (73%), and mixed growth was found in the other 3 episodes (27%). Approximately half (46%) of the episodes were associated with constipation and/or diarrhea. Of the Citrobacter isolates from all episodes, 54% were resistant to cefazolin, and only 18% were susceptible to cefmetazole. All isolates were susceptible to ceftazidime, cefepime, carbapenem, and aminoglycosides. More than half of the patients (54%) were hospitalized for index peritonitis, and 27% of the episodes involved a change in antibiotic medication. One patient had relapsing peritonitis caused by C. koseri (9%). The mortality rate of PD-related peritonitis caused by Citrobacter was 18%, and 89% of surviving patients developed technique failure requiring a modality switch after an average of 12 months of follow-up (range 1.2-31.2 months).

Conclusion: PD-related peritonitis caused by Citrobacter is associated with poor outcomes, including high rates of antibiotic resistance, a high mortality rate, and a high rate of technique failure among survivors during the follow-up period.

Keywords: Citrobacter, end-stage renal disease, gram-negative bacteria, peritoneal dialysis, peritonitis.

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How to cite this article:
Chao CT, Lee SY, Yang WS, Chen HW, Fang CC, Yen CJ, Chiang CK, Hung KY, Huang JW. Citrobacter Peritoneal Dialysis Peritonitis: Rare Occurrence with Poor Outcomes. Int J Med Sci 2013; 10(9):1092-1098. doi:10.7150/ijms.6251. Available from http://www.medsci.org/v10p1092.htm