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Int J Med Sci 2011; 8(1):74-83. doi:10.7150/ijms.8.74

Research Paper

Intravenous transplantation of allogeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and its directional migration to the necrotic femoral head

Zhang-hua Li1* , Wen Liao2*, Xi-long Cui1, Qiang Zhao3, Ming Liu1, You-hao Chen1, Tian-shu Liu1, Nong-le Liu3, Fang Wang3, Yang Yi4, Ning-sheng Shao3

1. Department of Orthopaedics, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, China.
2. Department of Orthopedics, Affiliated Hospital of Hebei University, Baoding 071000, China.
3. Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Beijing 100850, China.
4. College of Health Science, Wuhan Institute of Physical Education, Wuhan 430079, China.
* Zhang-hua Li and Wen Liao contributed equally to this work.

Abstract

In this study, we investigated the feasibility and safety of intravenous transplantation of allogeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for femoral head repair, and observed the migration and distribution of MSCs in hosts. MSCs were labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) in vitro and injected into nude mice via vena caudalis, and the distribution of MSCs was dynamically monitored at 0, 6, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after transplantation. Two weeks after the establishment of a rabbit model of femoral head necrosis, GFP labeled MSCs were injected into these rabbits via ear vein, immunological rejection and graft versus host disease were observed and necrotic and normal femoral heads, bone marrows, lungs, and livers were harvested at 2, 4 and 6 w after transplantation. The sections of these tissues were observed under fluorescent microscope. More than 70 % MSCs were successfully labeled with GFP at 72 h after labeling. MSCs were uniformly distributed in multiple organs and tissues including brain, lungs, heart, kidneys, intestine and bilateral hip joints of nude mice. In rabbits, at 6 w after intravenous transplantation, GFP labeled MSCs were noted in the lungs, liver, bone marrow and normal and necrotic femoral heads of rabbits, and the number of MSCs in bone marrow was higher than that in the, femoral head, liver and lungs. Furthermore, the number of MSCs peaked at 6 w after transplantation. Moreover, no immunological rejection and graft versus host disease were found after transplantation in rabbits. Our results revealed intravenously implanted MSCs could migrate into the femoral head of hosts, and especially migrate directionally and survive in the necrotic femoral heads. Thus, it is feasible and safe to treat femoral head necrosis by intravenous transplantation of allogeneic MSCs.

Keywords: femoral head necrosis, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell, migration, safety

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How to cite this article:
Li Zh, Liao W, Cui Xl, Zhao Q, Liu M, Chen Yh, Liu Ts, Liu Nl, Wang F, Yi Y, Shao Ns. Intravenous transplantation of allogeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and its directional migration to the necrotic femoral head. Int J Med Sci 2011; 8(1):74-83. doi:10.7150/ijms.8.74. Available from http://www.medsci.org/v08p0074.htm